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GScholar.EXE

 

This program reads an ASCII text file entitled google.txt as input. The file can be composed by cutting and pasting output of Google Scholar

into a single file using an ASCII editor like Notepad (using Ctrl-A, Ctrl-C, Ctrl-V).

 

The output is organized in two files named records.dbf and au.dbf which can be related through the field "nr". Records contains the unique information

such as title, journal name, publication year, and times cited; au.dbf organizes individual author names in the case of coauthorship. The file au.dbf allows for the construction of a coauthorship network. The .dbf files can be read by, for example, Excel, SPSS, and MSAccess (for relational database management).

 

For generating a coauthorship network from this data, Sanjeev Jha (UIC) suggests to do the following:

Open file "AU" in Excel. Click on cell A1. Click on Data Menu and choose Pivot Table and Pivot Chart. Click on finish, which creates a new spreadsheet. Drag and drop "AU" and "NR" in "Drop Row Fields" and "Drop column Fields". Then drag and drop "NR" in the center at Drop Data Items. This will create an author by NR matrix. You can use UCINET or any other software to create a co-authorship network.

 

See for most applications of Google Scholar also: Anne-Will Harzing’s Publish or Perish.

 

 

Google.EXE

 

This program reads an ASCII text file entitled advanced.txt as input. The file can be composed by cutting and pasting output of the Advanced Google search engine under Firefox 3.0 into a single file using an ASCII editor like Notepad (using Ctrl-A, Ctrl-C, Ctrl-V). Save the different files using the option “Text Files” under “Save Page As”, and paste them together in a single file under the name “advanced.txt”.

 

The output is organized in a file named records.dbf which contains three fields: the information line, the web link, and the sequence number. The .dbf file can be read by, for example, Excel, SPSS, and MSAccess (for relational database management).

 

 

 

 

Please, provide feedback if you find an error.

 

 

@ Loet Leydesdorff, July 2008